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ConservationCorridor.org March 2020 Newsletter

Human-assisted migration for the genetic rescue of small populations; How do you build a corridor for invertebrates?; Human land use reduces climate connectivity; In the News; Current Digests; Useful Links

Human-assisted migration for the genetic rescue of small populations

Corridor Science

How do we best manage small and fragmented populations? Human-assisted migration is a potentially powerful management strategy for the purpose of introducing new genetic material.

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How do you build a corridor for invertebrates?

Corridor Management

While we often think about corridor design for large, far-ranging animals, less attention is paid to how we ensure that populations of invertebrates stay connected.

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Human land use reduces climate connectivity

Climate Change

A new analysis of climate corridors across North America shows that incorporating human land use into projections significantly alters estimates.

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In the News

Virginia adopts new legislation to create Wildlife Corridors Action Plan

New film: "Migration Corridors: Connecting the People and Wildlife of New Mexico

New elevated highways benefit tigers and vehicles in India's Pench Tier Reserve


U.S. DOI awards over $3m in grants to 11 western states for migration corridor research

Connectivity threatened for grizzly bears in the Greater Yellowstone Ecoregion as death rates increase

Colorado to vote on wolf reintroduction that would connect existing populations

Last chance to submit a proposal to the Salazar Center on landscape connectivity in North America

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Management: Small-scale corridors for invertebrates

Climate Change: Climate connectivity and human land use

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